Crow’s paper on marine spatial planning is out in PNAS

Crow, with Ben Halpern and Carrie Kappel, looks at the tradeoffs between wind energy, whale watching, and two commercial fisheries in Massachusetts, using spatial arrangement of the wind farms as the control variable. They plot out a four-dimensional Pareto efficiency frontier – prepare to have your mind bent!

 

White, C., B.S. Halpern, and C.V. Kappel. 2012. Ecosystem service tradeoff analysis reveals the value of marine spatial planning for multiple ocean uses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 109: 4696-4701. [pub/OA]

Marine spatial planning (MSP) is an emerging responsibility of resource managers around the United States and elsewhere. A key proposed advantage of MSP is that it makes tradeoffs in resource use and sector (stakeholder group) values explicit, but doing so requires tools to assess tradeoffs. We extended tradeoff analyses from economics to simultaneously assess multiple ecosystem services and the values they provide to sectors using a robust, quantitative, and transparent framework. We used the framework to assess potential conflicts among offshore wind energy, commercial fishing, and whale-watching sectors in Massachusetts and identify and quantify the value from choosing optimal wind farm designs that minimize conflicts among these sectors. Most notably, we show that using MSP over conventional planning could prevent >$1 million dollars in losses to the incumbent fishery and whale-watching sectors and could generate >$10 billion in extra value to the energy sector. The value of MSP increased with the greater the number of sectors considered and the larger the area under management. Importantly, the framework can be applied even when sectors are not measured in dollars (e.g., conservation). Making tradeoffs explicit improves transparency in decision-making, helps avoid unnecessary conflicts attributable to perceived but weak tradeoffs, and focuses debate on finding the most efficient solutions to mitigate real tradeoffs and maximize sector values. Our analysis demonstrates the utility, feasibility, and value of MSP and provides timely support for the management transitions needed for society to address the challenges of an increasingly crowded ocean environment.

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About Bruce Kendall

I'm a professor of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. My research is primarily in ecological theory, with a population approach. I work in a number of applications including coastal fisheries, population viability analysis, and conservation biology; I do fundamental theoretical work on the implications of among-individual variability for population dynamics. I'm also an Associate Dean of the Graduate Division at UCSB.
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